Christopher Brellochs - saxophone, Mitchell Kriegler - clarinet
Christopher Brellochs - saxophone, Mitchell Kriegler - clarinet, Allison Brewster Franzetti - piano

Story

ROBERT ALDRIDGE (b. 1954): SOUND MOVES BLUES (1999) - published by Robert Aldridge

A prolific composer for all genres Robert Aldridge has received numerous commissions,
fellowships and awards for his music. His opera Elmer Gantry received unanimous praise from
The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Opera News. A CD recording of Elmer Gantry
(Florentine Opera/Milwaukee Symphony) will be released on July 1, 2011.
 
Aldridge is Professor of Composition at the John J. Cali School of Music at Montclair State
University, and Composer-in-Residence at the Brevard Music Festival.
 
Of “Sound Moves Blues”, Aldridge writes:
“It was commissioned by the trio SoundMoves and premiered in Oregon in 1999. The piece
is a loosely structured theme and variations based on the opening gesture. I often employ
blues-type forms, melodic and harmonic material in the variations. It was written to be an
exciting and fun concert-closer for that trio.”
Christopher Brellochs - saxophone, Donald Batchelder - trumpet, Allison Brewster Franzetti - piano

Story

SEYMOUR BARAB (b. 1921): SUITE FOR TRUMPET, ALTO SAXOPHONE, and PIANO (1996)
- published by Seesaw Music Corp

Chicago-born Seymour Barab began his professional career as a church organist, and later
studied cello, appearing with the Cleveland and Philadelphia Orchestras and the San Francisco
Symphony.

Barab founded the contemporary music ensemble Composer’s Quartet in New York. He was
also active on the other end of the spectrum, playing viola da gamba and founding New York
Pro Musica, which specialized in Baroque and Renaissance music. Barab taught at Rutgers
University, Black Mountain College and the New England Conservatory of Music. As a composer,
Barab is most well-known for his operas, including Little Red Riding Hood and Philip Marshall
which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.

The opening movement of Barab’s “Suite for Trumpet, Alto Saxophone and Piano” has playful
exchanges between the trumpet and saxophone, while the second movement is a yearning waltz.
The shifting accents in the third movement evoke the hustle-bustle of a busy city street, and
contrast with the fourth movement’s languid melodies. The final movement combines several of
the previous techniques, creating a charming suite filled with character.
Christopher Brellochs - saxophone, Donald Batchelder - trumpet, Mitchell Kriegler - clarinet & bass clarinet, Allison Brewster Franzetti - piano
composed by Aaron Copland, adapted by C. Brellochs

Story

It’s April 1939, and Aaron Copland brings his baton down as the curtain rises for the Group Theatre in New York City. It’s the dress rehearsal of Quiet City, an Irwin Shaw (1913-1984) play that never made it to opening night. “My career in the theatre has been a flop,” lamented Copland.

Copland’s incidental music for that play languished in obscurity. He used some of the music in a concert version of Quiet City for trumpet, English horn, and string orchestra and some in his film score Our Town. But the remainder of the score – along with a number of wonderful themes and motifs – has not been heard until now, over 70 years later.

This world premiere recording resurrects the unpublished score of Copland’s incidental music for Quiet City, in a new adaptation by composer, arranger and saxophonist Christopher Brellochs.

During his doctoral studies Brellochs obtained a copy of the unpublished manuscript to Quiet City from saxophonist and historian Paul Cohen. The score was handwritten by Copland, included cues and actor’s lines, and called for a chamber ensemble of trumpet, saxophone (doubling on clarinet), clarinet (doubling on bass clarinet), and piano. Here was never before heard music of
the highest quality, by an iconic American composer.

Brellochs immediately began to work on ideas to give this music a new life, crafting a concert version that preserved the original instrumentation and included all the original music. No new material was written. The music was reorganized for concert purposes and a few orchestration changes were made to achieve a balanced chamber quality (this included moving some melodies
from the trumpet, and eliminating the doubling in the saxophone). Paul Cohen provided invaluable advice and feedback throughout the crafting of this new chamber version.

The Aaron Copland Estate and Boosey and Hawkes, Copland’s publisher, embraced Brellochs’ newly reconstructed adaption of unknown Copland which will be published in 2011. In the catalogue, “Quiet City” sits alongside other concert versions of Copland’s works for the stage including “Appalachian Spring”, “Rodeo”, and “Billy the Kid”.

The exclusive right and opportunity to make a world premiere recording led to a search for other unrecorded works by American composers. The results of that search include the whirlwind composition “Sound Moves Blues” by Robert Aldridge, the charming “Suite for Trumpet, Alto Saxophone, and Piano” by Seymour Barab and the invitation to guest artist Paul Cohen to contribute recordings of works by Leo Ornstein, Walter Hartley and Lawson Lunde. Every work on the CD Quiet City features world premiere recordings of prominent American composers.
Christopher Brellochs - alto saxophone, SoHee Lee - piano
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Christopher Brellochs - alto saxophone, SoHee Lee - piano
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Christopher Brellochs - soprano saxophone, Melissa Santamaria - alto saxophone, Andy Lopez - tenor saxophone, Jeff Santoro - baritone saxophone
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"recorded live"
Christopher Brellochs - soprano saxophone, Melissa Santamaria - alto saxophone, Andy Lopez - tenor saxophone, Jeff Santoro - baritone saxophone
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"recorded live"
Christopher Brellochs - soprano saxophone, Melissa Santamaria - alto saxophone, Andy Lopez - tenor saxophone, Jeff Santoro - baritone saxophone
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"recorded live"
Christopher Brellochs - soprano saxophone, Alex Kontorovich - alto saxophone, Peter Lyons - tenor saxophone
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*arranged by C. Brellochs